Trailer

Play Dates

U.S. PREMIERE OF COMPLETE, UNCUT VERSION

September 5    San Francisco, CA    ROXIE

September 21 – 22    Detroit, MI    DETROIT INSTITUTE OF ARTS

November 8 & 10    Chicago, IL    DOC FILMS

November 9 & 30    Houston, TX    MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS

Christ Stopped at Eboli Play Dates

About

Italy/France, 1979
Director: Francesco Rosi
Producer: Franco Cristaldi, Nicola Carraro
Cast: Gian Maria Volontè, Paolo Bonacelli, Lea Massari, Irene Papas
Screenwriter: Francesco Rosi, Tonino Guerra, Raffaele La Capria
Based on the novel by Carlo Levi
Cinematography: Pasqualino De Santis
Costumes: Enrico Sabbatini
Genre: Drama
Color
Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
Language: Italian with English subtitles
Running Time: 220 minutes

Synopsis:
Carlo Levi (Gian Maria Volontè), a painter, writer, doctor, and intellectual, is exiled to Grassano, an impoverished town with only one car and one toilet, in southern Italy. Levi learns to find the humanity in this seemingly backward hamlet. Made for Italian television in four 55-minute parts, it was cut in half for its 1980 U.S. release (to 2 hours — Rosi’s own theatrical cut was 2½) and senselessly re-titled Eboli. This is the U.S. theatrical premiere of Rosi’s complete, uncut epic.  

Awards & Nominations:
Best Foreign Language Film (BAFTA Awards, 1983)
Best Film and Best Director (David Di Donatello Awards, 1979)
Best Foreign Film (French Syndicate of Cinema Critics, 1981)
Golden Prize (Moscow International Film Festival, 1979)
Best Supporting Actress - Lea Massari (Italian Syndicate of Film Journalists, 1979)

Reviews and Quotes 2

“A triumphant cinematic adaptation of an 'unfilmable' work...It’s both faithful and inspired. The play of strong yet covert emotions with ideas that gain depth as the film goes on is as pleasurable and invigorating as bold and exhilarating action.”
— Michael Sragow, Film Comment

“I was completely absorbed… the audience seemed hushed, as if at a concert where the musicians were playing very softly.”
— Pauline Kael

“Best viewed as a meditation, not a conventional drama… An absorbing and sometimes stunningly beautiful movie with an impressive sense of historical detail and social insight.”
— David Sterritt

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